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So Many Windows We Needed an Index... Or Did He Say Windex?

At times this project may seem like all windows and there is certainly a good reason for that. The house has seventy arched windows in addition to a handful of non arched windows in the basement. One of our early goals was being able to see outside through the house's many "eyes". Even more importantly we needed to be able to see while inside the house. Sunlight shining through the windows would be and still is our primary source of illumination.  There is still a ways to go in meeting that early goal but I couldn't be happier with the progress we have made thus far.  We are enjoying the beautiful views, many of which are completely new to us since they were obscured by plywood when we bought the house. A welcome bonus has been watching the snowflakes swirl by in the wintertime without feeling the biting cold that would sneak in during the early winters of our project. Here is an unfinished directory of some of our lovely additions.  More photos are on the way!



The First Floor


    This set of bay windows was our first completed set of windows. However, the first floor will most likely be the last floor to have all windows in places. There are still a few views that we have yet to experience as some of the windows are still boarded up by a random assortment of doors, whoever closed up the windows may have underestimated just how many they were when picking up plywood. 


The Second Floor

    This floor is currently in an in-between phase of window installation with many of the front and left side windows already in place. Our next window to arrive from production will be placed on this floor. 

These 7 1/2 foot tall front bay windows are one of my favorite additions. 


One of our obviously visible staircase windows, we do have two which are hidden from inside view. 


The Third Floor aka "The Attic" 

Window installation on this floor is nearly complete, with just one window waiting along the back wall for placement. 

These lovely "tablets" provide illumination for the main staircase. 


This window provides a lovely view of the Potter County Courthouse.

 


Our narrowest windows are located on this floor. 


The Tower  

    I've always been impressed with the 8 1/2 foot height of the tower windows. These are the largest windows in the house. The tower was the first and smallest "floor" to have all windows in place. Our initial focus was always the tower, it's the most eye-catching aspect of the house and tackling it seemed like the best way to show onlookers that the house was being saved!

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